Volunteering at Diospi Suyana Hospital

Some information about the Diospi Suyana Hospital from the Samaritan’s Purse website.  If you are a physician interested in volunteering, you can come through Samaritan’s Purse.


DIOSPI_PERU

Profile: Approximately 750,000 people, predominantly indigenous, live within a three hour radius of Curahuasi, Peru. Hospital Diospi Suyana offers comprehensive care to these descendants of the ancient Incas. The facility is equipped with 55 beds, four operating rooms, a five-bed intensive care unit, laboratory and radiology department (X-ray, ultrasound, and CT scan). The hospital is staffed by both Peruvian and expatriate staff.

Travel: You will fly by commercial airline into Lima, the capital city of Peru. Depending on the flight times it might be necessary to overnight in Lima. From Lima you will take a smaller flight to Cuzco. Again, depending on flight times, you might need to overnight in Cuzco. From Cuzco you will travel by ground transportation to Hospital Diospi Suyana. Ground transportation is usually in the form of a hired taxi arranged by the hospital, and normally takes two and one-half hours.

Time Difference: -1 hour Eastern Daylight Savings Time, U.S.A. Same time as Eastern Standard Time, U.S.A.

Location: The small town of Curahuasi, Peru is located in the Andes Mountains. Curahuasi is in the region of Apurimac, known as the poorhouse of Peru. Curahuasi is approximately 85 miles from Cusco, Peru.

People: The people in Curahuasi and the surrounding countryside are Quechua, but do not like to be called as such. They prefer the term “Quechua Hablante” (meaning one who speaks Quechua).

Language: Eighty percent of the local people are Quechua Hablante and their language is Quechua. Approximately 70 precent of Quechua can speak and understand Spanish at an adequate level. The hospital has some Peruvian staff who speak fluent Quechua when translation is necessary. FP, DGP, GS, IM, OBG, OPH, ORS, OTO, PD, U, must be fluent in Spanish

Religion: The area is predominantly Catholic with 10 percent being evangelicals. The area also has a lot of superstition and animism carried over from old Incan religious traditions.

Samaritan’s Purse – Information about Diospi Suyana Hospital

Some information about the Diospi Suyana Hospital from the Samaritan’s Purse website.  If you are a physician interested in volunteering, you can come through Samaritan’s Purse.


DIOSPI_PERU

Profile: Approximately 750,000 people, predominantly indigenous, live within a three hour radius of Curahuasi, Peru. Hospital Diospi Suyana offers comprehensive care to these descendants of the ancient Incas. The facility is equipped with 55 beds, four operating rooms, a five-bed intensive care unit, laboratory and radiology department (X-ray, ultrasound, and CT scan). The hospital is staffed by both Peruvian and expatriate staff.

Travel: You will fly by commercial airline into Lima, the capital city of Peru. Depending on the flight times it might be necessary to overnight in Lima. From Lima you will take a smaller flight to Cuzco. Again, depending on flight times, you might need to overnight in Cuzco. From Cuzco you will travel by ground transportation to Hospital Diospi Suyana. Ground transportation is usually in the form of a hired taxi arranged by the hospital, and normally takes two and one-half hours.

Time Difference: -1 hour Eastern Daylight Savings Time, U.S.A. Same time as Eastern Standard Time, U.S.A.

Location: The small town of Curahuasi, Peru is located in the Andes Mountains. Curahuasi is in the region of Apurimac, known as the poorhouse of Peru. Curahuasi is approximately 85 miles from Cusco, Peru.

People: The people in Curahuasi and the surrounding countryside are Quechua, but do not like to be called as such. They prefer the term “Quechua Hablante” (meaning one who speaks Quechua).

Language: Eighty percent of the local people are Quechua Hablante and their language is Quechua. Approximately 70 precent of Quechua can speak and understand Spanish at an adequate level. The hospital has some Peruvian staff who speak fluent Quechua when translation is necessary. FP, DGP, GS, IM, OBG, OPH, ORS, OTO, PD, U, must be fluent in Spanish

Religion: The area is predominantly Catholic with 10 percent being evangelicals. The area also has a lot of superstition and animism carried over from old Incan religious traditions.

Medical Missions Resources for those ready to go right when they finish residency training!

World Medical Missions is a branch of Samaritans Purse.  This organization sponsors a Post Residency Program that I wish had been available when I finished residency.  In their efforts and hopes to get physicians interested in spending their lives serving in the mission field, they will sponsor physicians for two years straight out of residency.  This allows new physicians to serve without the worries of raising support.  There is another great resource available for physician missionaries called Project MedSend which helps physicians with their student loans while they are in the mission field so they can serve in poorer countries where their services are donated.  God is doing great work through people who are working for his purposes in all the world.  I am thankful for the people of World Medical Missions and MedSend who are making the way easier for medical personnel to enter the mission field.

Peru and Above – Introducing another medical missionary blog

We have some friends, Ryan and Kirsten Morigeau who are moving to Peru to work at Diospi Suyana Hospital in Peru.  They have an interesting blog describing their experiences as they move forward in the process of serving in Peru.  They are actually going to language school here in Costa Rica at a different language school.  We have met them only briefly at a bus stop in San Jose as they were traveling for a little recreation at the beach.  We are hoping to spend a little more time with them soon here in Costa Rica, but if not we have a few years to spend with them in Curahuasi.  If you are interested, look at their blog at Peru & Above.  They have a good description of Curahuasi, Peru which I have included below.  They also have a nice description of the Hospital Diospi Suyana.  They are from Portland, OR and they have caught the vision for serving the poor in Peru.  They are coming through World Medical Missions which is part of Samaratin’s Purse.  I am thankful for the Morigeau family who will be in Peru with us.   Continue reading