Rain, Walks, Exercise, Mental Health

View this post on Instagram

Rain walk = happy walk

A post shared by Will Caire (@willcaire) on

It was a bit of a rough day in regards to mood in our house yesterday. I have been reading a little bit about exercise and mood enhancement, and the correlation is pretty strong that exercise is good for mental health. This is especially true in anxiety and depression. I would say those are the most common struggles of many of us, and especially those of us living in a different culture. I tend to be more optimistic if I find time to exercise, and I envy those who find it easy to do. I do not always want to exercise, much less do I find the time to do it. And this is despite knowing the positive effects. So with everyone a bit down yesterday, I decided we were going on a walk. We would go to the caves and then up to the railroad tracks. A few short steep uphill sections followed by a meandering downhill walk. We noted some clouds in the sky, but it seemed like there was more sun than clouds. The old Boy Scout in me recommended we take some jackets. It was good that we did, because just as we reached the cave, the rain came. We decided we would cross-country home, bush-wacking, avoiding steep drop-offs, spraining wrists, and ruining clothing. But we made it. And you can decide for yourself from the picture whether it had a positive affect.

What Are the Kids Doing?

Not many kids in the United States start school wearing sweaters and jackets. It is one of the weird parts of living in the southern hemisphere at 7000 feet elevation. All of the kids attend Rift Valley Academy, participating in different activities including rugby, band, art, and Model United Nations to name a few. RVA is a boarding school, but our kids live with us and walk up to the school every day. They are glad they get to go home and are not burdened by the “rules” of boarding school life. We are glad they are home, too, but can still enjoy the social life offered at school.

Rain Update

From David’s Conceptual Physics teacher, Jeff Davis.

Closing in on 30 inches for the year (29.88 as I type and it rains)! Avg rainfall for Kijabe in a year is 37 inches.
 
6.7 inches so far for May, with 17 of 20 days having precipitation. The average rainfall for May going back 30 years is 6.3 inches.
 
Sorry, I don’t have temperature data but I do know my house is steadily getting colder and is now down to 62 F (sorry non-Americans out there, just consider us an “unreached” people group). J
 
And we can’t even say, “but it’s a dry heat”. Because it’s a wet cold, which is the worst.
 
I was just thinking this morning that living in Tacoma, WA for two years prepared us for long gray days. The fact that the sun breaks through on occasion makes it bearable. The sun never broke through in Tacoma. It sure is soggy!
img_1760

Baboon Battle

This happened near our neighbors house. Baboon turf wars! Awesome! In more lighthearted moments, our girls will sometimes be amused while they are in school by watching out their classroom windows at the baboons going down the playground slide.

Dubai is Dallas on Steroids

Dubai in the United Arab Emirates is a Muslim country with strict religious rules. Many women are covered in burkas. You hear the call to prayer throughout the day. Yet I think it felt like the most American place I have ever visited outside of the United States. I have been wondering about why (because it is actually very different – I am referring to only how I felt being there), and I think it dawned on me today. It was the consumerism, the “bigness”, and the ambition. I have never felt more at home in another cultural context, and it was because of all the shopping and dining options, the open freeways, the grandiosity, the comfortable and spacious accommodations, and the wealth. We ate at Five Guys Burgers, Krispy Kreme, Shake Shack, and Chili’s (although the best food we ate was Lebanese). We went to the world’s biggest mall to look for clothes at The Gap and to visit to the tallest building (Burj Khalifa) in the world. I come from a state which claims that everything is bigger, and surprisingly in Dubai I found myself myself in a city where everything was the biggest. It felt like Dallas on steroids.

img_1952

img_1931

The Burj Khalifa fountain. Gotta get it on video.

img_1947

On the beach walk.

img_1936

Sports cars were everywhere.

img_1923

Burj Khalifa – I couldn’t fit it in my phone’s camera