The Eyes Have It

I’m doing a lot of thinking about eyes lately. The most graphic reminder is our precious daughter, Sarah. Look at her poor eye!

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This was after a week of healing. You should have seen it at its worst!

This pitiful looking burn is brought to you by a bug, ironically named “Nairobi Eye.” If you crush them or even, as Sarah did, flick them off you, they release an acid that burns the skin. We have had a major infestation on campus, as well as a few around our house. I washed one down the shower drain the other morning, as I did not want to bathe with it. Sarah was playing outside with her friends, climbing on playground equipment, and one of these beetles dropped on her face.

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Although I feel a wave of sympathy every time I look at her, I keep reminding myself to be so thankful that she did not get the acid inside her eye.

 

 

I am leading the ninth grade through The Chosen by Chaim Potok. I don’t want to spoil anything for those of you who have not read it (you should!), but in the first few chapters the narrator wonders if he might lose his eye. I was telling my classes that my mom lost her right eye and functioned very well for twenty years more! It is a brilliant metaphor in the book for the character’s awakening, for his experience of seeing things with new eyes, reconsidering all his assumptions. It makes me wonder what I need to re-see, what I assume is truth that needs to be upended. Living in another country will do that to you– challenge your assumptions, so that you can see better.

Biking

Lost a screw. Broken bike. Long way to home.

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The best recreational activities in Kijabe, just as they were in Peru, are biking and hiking. Peter came on the 4×4 with a bike wrench so that I could put the screw back in and ride home. If it had not been for some school kids walking home from school along the road who found my screw and delivered it to me I would have been without a working bike until I could find a replacement part. I am thankful for honest Kenyan children. As I called home to get help, I felt them sneaking up behind me and touching my white skin. I hope they liked the way my sweaty white skin felt.

Weekend Trip to Mt. Longonot

All of this is just 30 minutes from our house. I love climbing up and looking into this crater. We finally have a car to get there!

 

Maternity Photos

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Resting after delivery watching her baby be checked over.

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Everyone enjoys a new baby, but not everyone is smiling so big for a picture

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Triplets coming soon. She is less than 34 weeks.

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His wife had preterm twins. So far they are doing well. Why do I look so tired?

Here Comes the Sun

Is it possible that rainy season may becoming less?

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Not sure this truck is moving until rainy season ends.

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Medical Education

Outside of good medical care I think the biggest mission we have at Kijabe Hospital is medical education. We have some many nursing students, clinical officer interns, medical officer interns, and residents roaming our halls it can make your head spin. There is no way to keep track of everybody. It is such an important part of what we do, training the next generation of doctors and medical workers to provide excellent, thorough, compassionate, and hopefully Christian care to the under-served areas of the world.

Teaching gynecology rounds.

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Rain Update

From David’s Conceptual Physics teacher, Jeff Davis.

Closing in on 30 inches for the year (29.88 as I type and it rains)! Avg rainfall for Kijabe in a year is 37 inches.
 
6.7 inches so far for May, with 17 of 20 days having precipitation. The average rainfall for May going back 30 years is 6.3 inches.
 
Sorry, I don’t have temperature data but I do know my house is steadily getting colder and is now down to 62 F (sorry non-Americans out there, just consider us an “unreached” people group). J
 
And we can’t even say, “but it’s a dry heat”. Because it’s a wet cold, which is the worst.
 
I was just thinking this morning that living in Tacoma, WA for two years prepared us for long gray days. The fact that the sun breaks through on occasion makes it bearable. The sun never broke through in Tacoma. It sure is soggy!
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