What is Will Doing?

Will continues to be busy in the hospital. For the last 6 months he has been serving primarily on the obstetrics service with occasional shifts in the emergency department. Working in obstetrics means lots of nights on call with runs to the hospital for whatever emergency has recently arrived. It can be tiring, so pray that he will have the energy he needs for each day. A bigger part of Will’s job is Christian medical education. The hospital is full of young doctors, clinical officers, and nurses who come to Kijabe Mission Hospital for medical training. Each day Will is involved in teaching these young doctors through mentoring and training in the wards as well as in didactic medical lectures. The hope is that these doctors will go throughout Kenya and East Africa, practicing excellent medicine as well as sharing the good news of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Obstetrics

I am still working in obstetrics. I did not expect it to be such a big part of my job when I moved to Kijabe. I have a love-hate relationship with delivering babies. When it is going well, it is fun and joyful. When it goes bad, it is probably the worst thing in medicine. And then there are times when things threaten to go bad, but because we are there as physicians and healthcare workers things go well. Of course, that is very satisfying. Probably the best part is holding babies after they are delivered. I should take advantage of the opportunity more often. I pray all the time when things get a little scary in the hospital. I trust God to help me make timely and wise decisions. And then I use the knowledge and experience that he has given me to do the very best I can. God is good, and I have learned a lot.

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A pretty nice part of the job!

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Our Friend Bishop

From the Kijabe Hospital Facebook page . . .

Meet Robert Cheruiyot our Assistant Manager Nursery- Newborn Unit. Popularly referred to as ‘Bishop’ though not ordained for praying and teaching the Word to his patients and colleagues when he can. He is trained and licenced expert nurse having a Certificate in Nursing and later a Diploma in Nursing from our Kijabe College of Health Sciences. He has immense love for children because he believes they’re the future of our nation particularly investing in them through quality healthcare and education will lead to a successful future.

Allison is the Name

Sam Goes to Kenya – A Kijabe Blog

From our friend Samantha’s blog on life her in Kijabe come these good words.

I don’t pretend to know why one child dies and another one doesn’t. I don’t have any great answers for that giant theological dilemma. But I do know that Paul carried on. He survived great peril, and horrible conditions, and despicable things done to him. Yet he carried on, full of joy and praising God for his trials. So I’m carrying on. And in the midst of carrying on, I am finding that I’m beginning to love this place and love these people and this culture. As crazy as these first 6 months have been, it’s starting to feel like home here…

She wrote a long post about her first six months working at Kijabe. Samantha and I share a job, splitting between maternity and the out patient department, so her experiences are much like my own. If you want a glimpse into the life of a doctor in their first year of service in Kijabe, you can read about it at Sam Goes to Kenya – The First Six Months.

Thank You Volunteers

I am thankful for the Cornici family who came and spent a year with us working in the emergency department of AIC Kijabe Mission Hospital. There are lots of “goodbyes” in a mission hospital, but with that come lots of “hellos” and new friends. We are thankful for our new friends all over the world, even though for now we have had to say “goodbye”.

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Kwaheri Cornicis

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