A Eulogy

See what Moore’s getting at here? He’s saying that the best way to influence the culture for Christ is to stop trying to “influence the culture for Christ”, but rather to be deeply and thoughtfully Christian, and to allow your countercultural life to be your testimony. – The Religious Right: A Eulogy

I read this long article about a presentation that Russell Moore gave at the First Things Erasmus Lecture. I posted it on Facebook, and a friend David mentioned that “Counter culture living is the best unsaid policy,” and I completely agree. A time is coming when we, as Christians, will be more and more countercultural in our living. We will not even be able to engage well politically because we will be so different from the culture that those in politics will not accept us. I am not necessarily looking forward to the day, because it is nice to live in a culture strongly influenced by Christianity. However, I am looking forward to the time when a Christian life looks obviously different than the cultural norm. Then we will have the opportunity to give a reason for the hope we have and for why we are who we are.

Who is going to harm you if you are eager to do good? But even if you should suffer for what is right, you are blessed. “Do not fear their threats do not be frightened.” But in your hearts revere Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect, keeping a clear conscience, so that those who speak maliciously against your good behavior in Christ may be ashamed of their slander. For it is better, if it is God’s will, to suffer for doing good than for doing evil. 1 Peter 3:13-17

More on Happiness

The God we love is the enemy of sin and the creator and friend of fun and laughter.

Many Christians in church history knew that happiness, gladness, feasting, and partying are God’s gifts.

But habitual unhappiness is a pitiful way to live.

When we seek holiness at the expense of happiness or happiness at the expense of holiness, we lose both the joy of being holy and the happiness birthed by obedience. God commands holiness, knowing that when we follow his plan, we’ll be happy. He also commands happiness, which makes obeying him not only duty, but also pleasure.

Alcorn, Randy (2015-09-17). Happiness . Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

Tuberculosis

We diagnose tuberculosis at our hospital frequently.

I think this is old TB, or possibly new TB on top of old TB.

A post shared by Will Caire (@willcaire) on

We do not actually treat tuberculosis, because the government is in charge of the treatment. So a patient like the above will come in looking very malnourished and chronically sick, and even if I cannot diagnose TB in the moment, I will send them on to the governmental health care clinic near their pueblo to have TB ruled out. It is tough sometimes, because you are torn between whether you should admit to the hospital this very ill looking patient, or whether you should send them on to the place where they can get a more definitive treatment. This patient I sent on, and I hope it was the right decision.

5th Grade Sleepover

Annie’s class is blessed with a super committed Christian teacher.  David is creative, active, inclusive, and energetic. He loves training his class to do dramas.  He has been the catalyst for a complete 180 degree turn in both Annie and Peter’s attitudes towards math–now it is their favorite subject.  He has invited his students to ultimate frisbee nights, where they share a devotional every week; a one-year discipleship course; and their moms to his wife’s Bible study group. Some of our regular blog readers will remember a little boy Dany who was missing. David was tireless in searching for him.  There was another kid in Annie’s class who needed lots of love and discipline.  David attempted so many creative approaches to help him stay in school and succeed socially.  I think he could write a book on strategies to reach the seemingly unreachable.  It is a daily blessing that our kids get to sit under his tutelage.

Profe David decided that their class needed some bonding time, so he planned a sleepover. But this wasn’t a sleepover like you’d imagine, with pizza and Coke and giggling over secrets shared from sleeping bags.  During the school day, Annie’s class visited three schools and shared the gospel through dramas and wordless books (colors that tell the major points of the good news).  In the afternoon, they went on a treasure hunt with the Scouts-type club we have at school followed by stations of games/ values teaching.  After a cookout dinner, they had a devotional and the director shared the gospel with them. In the morning, they ran and prayed, then played interactive games with their parents.  David had the parents divide up in groups to plan the meals, so we got to know one another a bit better as well.  I had the privilege of taking a group of kids in the car while they shared their dramas.  Visiting public schools in the area was eye opening.  Watching the kids share God’s story gave me goosebumps.  Seeing their confidence was inspirational. We love you, Profesor David! (Click the pictures below to see them larger.)

In Pursuit of Happiness

If we weigh the value of our happiness against the needs of a suffering world, we may suppose we have no right to be happy. But the fact is, miserable Christians have nothing to offer a suffering world. Our happiness in Christ, which involves not indifference but heartfelt compassion, allows us to help others and share with them the joy in Christ. It is this same happiness that energizes and sustains us as we serve God and others.

Spurgeon loved to connect the gospel and happiness: “There is nothing that more tends to strengthen the faith of the young believer than to hear the veteran Christian, covered with scars from the battle, testifying that the service of his Master is a happy service, and that, if he could have served any other master, he would not have done so, for His service is pleasant, and His reward everlasting joy.”

G. K. Chesterton (1874– 1936) has been widely credited with saying, “Jesus promised His disciples three things  — that they would be completely fearless, absurdly happy, and in constant trouble.”

Alcorn, Randy (2015-09-17). Happiness (pp. 33, 27, 25-26). Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.. Kindle Edition.