Teaching

We train doctors and clinical officers at Kijabe. If you come to the hospital as a volunteer physician, be ready to teach. We can help the people in front of us while preparing others to help the people we will never meet in the future.

Our Neighborhood

I took this picture on a recent hike. The arrow on the left is pointing to Rift Valley Academy, The arrow on the right is pointed toward the hospital. The bottom arrow is Old Kijabe Road. It goes from RVA down through Kijabe town and on to the lower valley road. To go from the area of the hospital, through the forest to the road, then up to RVA, and then back through the forest to the hospital is a common exercise loop for those of us serving at the school or the hospital. Our house is located in the forest about equally distant from and between the top two arrows. It takes me about 40 minutes of walking, heavy breathing, and sweat to get to this lookout. I love walking these forests inhabited by the seen monkeys and baboons and the unseen leopards and hyenas

Back in Kijabe

We are glad to be home! I am working again in the hospital. In fact this weekend I have been busy covering the ICU. I am glad for the meaningful work, and again I am impressed with the challenges of doing good care in complex situations. Allison is teaching at RVA, and the kids are in school. We all feel a hole in our lives where David was, however it is not a painful hole, but a sudden missing of having him around. We are happy for him at ACU! He seems to be having a good time. The weather has been beautiful overall, and that has allowed us to get out and do some walks on the weekend. All these pictures are taken within an easy walk of our house. We live in a beautiful part of the world. We are thankful!

In the United States

We are stateside! We would love to see you if you are free. We have a couple goals . . . the most important is a successful install of David at Abilene Christian University. So far this goal is progressing well. The next is to get our passports renewed. This is not going so well. We tried to renew in Kenya, but embassy appointments were impossible to get without an emergency. We have to renew then before we can fly back to Kenya, but we cannot do a fast passport renewal without a life or death situation. We do not have that, and so we have expedited our renewal (read that as expensive!), but even with that, the renewal can take up to 12 weeks. That is better than the 20 weeks for a non-expedited passport, but still not very fast. I am hopeful it will take less than 12 . . . maybe more like six. Is that too hopeful? Please pray for us in regards to our passports.

We are doing some support raising visits. Please pray for that as well. I have very mixed feeling about support raising. I have made new, good friends through the process. God has given us strangers to support our work, and now those strangers are friends. I feel blessed to be taken care of by God and by other Christians. On the other hand, I do not like the humbling feeling of asking for help. One of the things that pulls me to leave the mission field is my desire to take care of my family financially. Knowing I can be in the US working and providing well for Allison and the kids, instead of living much more frugally in Kenya is a weird temptation. I love working in Kenya, yet the desire to be “self-sufficient” and a “provider” are very strong urges. There is tension there. Taking care of your family is a Godly trait, so it is weird to choose a path that hinders that responsibility (at least from a worldly perspective to which I am susceptible). My thoughts on support raising are complicated, and instead of going on, I will just ask again that you will pray that God will provide as he always has so far.

David Graduated!

Goodbye Rift Valley Academy Buffalos! Come on Abilene Christian University Wildcats!! David managed to graduate well, avoiding too many demerits while being in National Honor Society and winning the award for the best Senior student in the Social Studies department which he demonstrated by being a part of the African Model United Nations, taking multiple AP history classes, and being enrolled in the most Social Studies classes of any student in his class. He was proud to have his first term late night boxing match (RVA legend making) mentioned by the school’s graduation speaker from the podium. Last week he went on his “Senior Safo” to the beach, and last night we ended the day with a small graduation party at our house.Today we will take him to his favorite restaurant in Nairobi right after we get our preflight COVID tests done. We are looking forward to his next steps at ACU? Do we have a future businessman, politician, or lawyer? Could we hope for a university professor? The next four years (maybe more) will sort it out!

Heaven and earth

September will mark 10 years since Mom entered the rest promised to those who love the Lord. So long, in fact, that many of you blog readers have never met her. As I was considering this, the first word that popped into my mind to describe her was “powerhouse.” This may conjure images of a pencil-skirt wearing businesswoman who doesn’t take nothing from nobody and who is getting things done, walking briskly through the office in stilettos. Not that kind of powerhouse. Mom was more like a miniature sun. Powerful, yes, getting things done, yes, but warm, inviting, bringing growth and light. She came into a room and you just felt better, felt like basking in her presence. When you were with Mom, there would be empathy, laughter, genuine peace, Scripture, and probably some good food.

When Mom first died, people would comfort me by saying that now she was looking down on us from Heaven. Heaven just seemed so far away, so remote from the world, and I would say “Thank you” and think in my heart, “Oh, she’s got far better things to look at and participate in where she is. There is a vast gap between Heaven and here.” But in the intervening years, I’ve grown to think differently. Maybe the connection between heaven and earth is stronger than I used to think. Just as the angels rejoice over one sinner, it seems that the victories that Christ accomplishes on earth are celebrated in Heaven.

One of the satisfying things about growing older is having a longer view of what the Lord is doing on the earth and having a bit more experience watching how His plan is unfolding. I consider that might extend into Heaven. Maybe the saints can praise the Lord for the way that He is still moving and changing people, for the redemption stories that dot the earth.

Perhaps Mom can participate in the satisfaction of watching our kids as teenagers, maybe she can still feel proud of the men and women they are becoming. Why not if all good gifts and pleasures are created by the Lord, including seeing people grow up? Annie responding well to a word of correction, Peter talking about praying for enemies, Sarah expressing her creative gifts, David accepting the love of his friends, Will caring for his hospital patients. These are deep joys I know Mom would appreciate. All of this growth comes out of pain and struggle and fight against the flesh, which glorifies and beautifies the victory.

And if it’s not true and it’s only God the Three in One who sees, but it gives us comfort to think of the great cloud of witnesses cheering us on as we run the race, what’s the harm in that? So, God, thank you for being so intimately among us and for fully participating in our puny lives. And, Mom, if you see me, I sure do love you. Thanks for shouting from the sidelines.